Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen

Table of Contents

Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This type of drug works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in your body. Ibuprofen can be used to reduce fever and inflammation caused by various conditions, such as headaches, toothaches, back pain, arthritis, menstrual cramps, or minor injuries.

Adults and children (who are at least 6 months old) can take ibuprofen in the dosage recommended by their doctor. An ibuprofen overdose can damage your stomach or intestines. Use only the smallest amount of ibuprofen needed to get relief from pain, swelling, or fever. 

Be aware of the risk of how high doses of ibuprofen can cause significant gastrointestinal bleeding. It may occur without warning when you are taking ibuprofen, especially in older adults.

Ibuprofen can increase the risk of heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it in the long run, at high doses, or suffer from heart disease. Do not take medicine before or after heart bypass surgery.

Production of Ibuprofen

The active ingredients in each tablet: Ibuprofen USP (United States Pharmacopeia) 200 mg.

Ibuprofen Dosage Consideration

Dosing considerations for dysmenorrhea in adults:

  • Recommended dose of 200-400 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Dosing considerations for osteoarthritis in adults:  

  • Initial dose of 400 to 800 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours.
  • Maintenance dose may be increased to a maximum daily dose of 3200 mg based on patient response and tolerance.

Dosing considerations for rheumatoid arthritis in adults:

  • Initial dose of 400 to 800 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours.
  • Maintenance dose may be increased to a maximum daily dose of 3200 mg based on patient response and tolerance.

Dosing considerations for fever or pain management in adults: 

  • Oral medications for mild to moderate pain, 200 to 400 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
  • IV infusion of 400 to 800 mg for 30 minutes every 6 hours as needed. Patients should be well-hydrated prior to IV administration of ibuprofen.
  • Initial dose for fever management is 400 mg IV for 30 minutes.
  • Maintenance dose of 400 mg every 4 to 6 hours or 100 to 200 mg every 4 hours as needed.

Dosing considerations for fever or pain management in children:

  • Recommended dose for children over 6 months to 12 years old is 5 mg / kg per dose for temperatures less than 102.5 ° F (39.2 ° C) orally every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
  • Dose of 10 mg / kg per dose for temperatures greater than or equal to 102.5 ° F (39.2 ° C) orally every 6 to 8 hours as needed. The maximum recommended daily dose is 40 mg / kg.
  • Recommended dose for children 6 months to 11 years old is 7.5 mg / kg per dose every 6 to 8 hours. The maximum recommended daily dose is 30 mg / kg.

Guidelines for Ibuprofen

  • Use ibuprofen as directed on the label or as prescribed by your doctor or use the lowest effective dose to treat pain, swelling, or fever.
  • Do not take more than the recommended dose by your doctor–as an overdose can damage your stomach or intestines. The maximum amount of ibuprofen for adults is 800 mg per dose or 3200 mg per day (4 doses, maximum).
  • The dose of ibuprofen is based on the age and weight of the child. Make sure to follow all the dosage instructions. 
  • Take ibuprofen with food or milk to reduce the chance of a stomach upset.
  • Shake the liquid well before measuring the dose. Measure liquid medicine with the syringe provided, dosing spoons, or medicine cup. If you don’t have a dosing device, check with your pharmacist.
  • Chewable ibuprofen tablets should be chewed before swallowing.
  • For long-term use of ibuprofen, you may need more frequent medical tests.
  • Store the medicine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Liquid medicine should not be stored in the freezer. 
  • Read all the information, treatment guides, and instruction sheets from the drug’s packaging. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

How Ibuprofen Can be Used

Ibuprofen may be used as temporary relief for minor aches and pains due to: 

  • Common cold
  • Toothache
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Back pain
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Mild arthritis
  • Temporary fever

Contraindications for Ibuprofen

Before taking ibuprofen, inform your doctor or pharmacist if you have an allergy to ibuprofen. or aspirin or other NSAIDs (such as naproxen, celecoxib) or if you have any other allergies.

In addition, make sure to let your doctor or pharmacist know about your medical history, especially if you have asthma, blood disorders, nasal polyps, heart disease, high blood pressure, liver disease, stroke, and throat, stomach, or intestinal problems.

Kidney problems may also sometimes occur with the use of NSAIDs, including ibuprofen. You are at higher risk of having kidney-related conditions if you have dehydration, heart failure or kidney disease, or if you take certain medications. Drink plenty of fluids as recommended by your doctor to prevent dehydration and tell your doctor right away if you experience changes in urine output. 

Warnings

Seek emergency medical help if you have an allergic reaction to ibuprofen, such as:

  • Rash or itching skin
  • Swelling in your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Sneezing, runny nose or stuffy nose or difficulty breathing (wheezing).

Seek emergency medical help if you have signs of a heart attack or stroke, such as:

  • Numbness
  • Slurred speech.
  • Swollen foot.
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weakness on one side of the body.
  • Chest pain radiating to your jaw or shoulder.

Stop using ibuprofen and call your doctor right away if you experience:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Skin rashes 
  • Vision changes.
  • Rapid weight gain.
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding, such as bloody stools, coughing up blood, or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.
  • Low red blood cells (anemia), such as pale skin, dizziness, shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, or difficulty concentrating.
  • Kidney problems, such as little or no urination, pain or difficulty urinating, swelling in your feet or ankles, fatigue, or shortness of breath.
  • Liver problems, such as nausea, pain in the upper abdomen, itching, tiredness, flu-like symptoms, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice.
  • Severe skin reactions, such as fever, sore throat, swelling in the face or tongue, burning sensation in the eyes, skin pain followed by a red or purple rash that spreads – causing blisters and peeling skin

Side Effects of Ibuprofen

Common side effects of ibuprofen may include:

  • Ringing in the ears
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mild itching or rashes
  • Dizziness, headache and nervousness
  • Bloating, diarrhea, and constipation
  • Stomach upset, light heartburn, nausea, and vomiting

Make an appointment with your doctor or pharmacist through Smarter Health to find out more about the recommended dosage for ibuprofen and its proper use based on your condition. Smarter Health allows you to access health services whenever you need them.

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